Friday, 30 November 2012

The Sunderland Point Tram

The Sunderland Point tram in a farmer's field on a remote Lancashire peninsula
Less than 20 miles from Blackpool as the crow flies, lies a 110 year old tram body that has lain in a farmer's field for over half a century. Sunderland Point lies south west of Lancaster on a peninsula of land between the River Lune and Morecambe Bay. The small quayside was a thriving port during the 18th century, handling slave ships and cotton ships during the early days of the cotton industry. The access road to Sunderland Point village is cut off twice a day by the high tide, so the people who live in the small village have to time their journeys to the mainland to coincide with low tide. Originally there were several tram bodies in the area, from both the Bradford and Huddersfield tram systems, in use as holiday homes. This tram body may be the only survivor now, and is believed to be from Bradford.

The remains of the lower saloon of a former double-deck tram at Sunderland Point, near Lancaster 

The remains of the lower saloon of a former double-deck tram at Sunderland Point, near Lancaster 
The interior of the tram body at Sunderland Point, showing the wood panelling still in place on the end bulkhead 

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